Why are pullups so hard?

why are pullups so hard

There’s a lot of talk out there about push – pull workouts, and I’ve got nothing against them, but I have a different approach.

I use three different groups:

Push, pull, rotation, locomotion, level changes

Core, posture, arms, and legs

Strength, endurance, cardio, balance, and flexibility

I know it sounds like a lot, but all of these things are important to me in training someone, and when these are put into a workout, it’s obvious that they work well together, especially when the goal is to have a hotter body. If you’ve seen the videos, mostly we’re working the core and doing tons of twisting movements, also most of the workouts are low impact so it’s easy on the knees, and less likely to cause injury for those athletes that already endure impact on the field.

With things like the No Jumping Jumping Jacks (N triple J’s) and sliding. My goal is to get people in shape, or back in shape safely, and as soon as possible, while giving them meal plans and routines that they can easily do without changing their whole life around.

The more you weigh the more calories you’ll burn

One pull-up burns approximately one calorie, according to Fat Burn’s activity tool. Since 3,500 calories equal one pound, you will need to do 3,500 pull-ups to see weight loss.

The average amount of Squats in one minute is 25. Doing the math, this means 1 Squat (moderate effort) equals 0.32 calories

From Livestrong.com

What muscles do pullups work?

Pull-ups primarily work the latissimus dorsi, or “lats,” which are the large muscles on the back. They also work the biceps, the forearms, and the middle and lower trapezius muscles. The muscles of the shoulder, chest, and core are also used as stabilizers during pull-ups. The rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, and obliques, which are responsible for maintaining proper posture and balance, are also activated during pull-ups. Additionally, the rhomboids, the teres major and minor, and the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles which are located in the shoulder are also activated during pull-ups.

Chin-ups work many of the same muscles as pull-ups, but with a greater emphasis on the biceps. The primary muscles used in chin-ups are:

  • Latissimus dorsi (lats): the large muscles on the back that help to pull the shoulders down and back.
  • Biceps brachii: the muscle on the front of the upper arm that flexes the elbow and supinates the hand (turns the hand so that the palm faces up).
  • Forearm muscles: particularly the brachioradialis, which helps to flex the elbow.
  • Middle and lower trapezius: the muscles that run along the upper back and help to stabilize the shoulder blades during the movement.
  • The muscles of the shoulder, chest, and core are also used as stabilizers during chin-ups.
  • The rhomboids, the teres major and minor, and the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles which are located in the shoulder are also activated during chin-ups.